The Blackbird

Have you ever seen an SR-71 Blackbird?

SR-71 Blackbird, Lockheed, Castle Air Force Base, Atwater California, Fastest JetThis Blackbird is serial number 71-7960 and is on display at the Castle Air Museum in Atwater, California.

You can see more pictures from the museum in my post: Castle Air

I have also seen serial number 71-7961 which is at the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas.

SR-71 Blackbird, Lockheed, Castle Air Force Base, Atwater California, Fastest Jet The SR-71 was built by Lockheed and was developed as a reconnaissance aircraft. The aircraft could fly high and fast and is still the holder of many speed records. The Blackbird’s top speed was over 2,200 miles per hour.

Can you imagine flying from LA to Washington, D.C. in only 64 minutes? The Blackbird did.

SR-71 Blackbird, Lockheed, Castle Air Force Base, Atwater California, Fastest JetThe SR-71 was not a big jet, it had a wing span of just a little over 55 feet and was only a little over 107 feet long.

The aircraft operated with a crew of two, the Pilot and the Reconnaissance Systems Officer. They had cramped quarters, but the flights didn’t last too long.

SR-71 Blackbird, Lockheed, Castle Air Force Base, Atwater California, Fastest Jet, Blackbird Nose, Blackbird ProfileThe first SR-71 flight was in 1964 and the last came in 1999.

There were only 32 Blackbirds built and most of the 20 remaining aircraft are on display at museums in the US. The only one that is outside the US is at a museum in Duxford, England.

Today reconnaissance is mainly done with unmanned aircraft, but there is an SR-72 in development. Time will tell if it ever takes flight.

SR-71 Blackbird - Lockheed - Castle Air MuseumI will leave you with one last picture. This is the picture that I used in my post from last year.

Steven

Fruits of My Labor

Tonight you get to see the results from when I helped with Drying Apricots.

Apricot Drying, Drying Tray, Apricot halves, Fruit processingIn my previous post I went through the process of how to cut and dry apricots. Here is a picture from the previous post showing a tray of apricots ready to be dried.

Dried Apricots, Patterson California, Orchard, Apricots, Dried Fruit, Fruits of LaborHere you get to see some of the fruits of my labor. You can see that the apricots have dried out, but still have some moisture left in them. They have a nice texture and a very good taste.

Dried Apricots, Patterson California, Orchard, Apricots, Dried Fruit, Fruits of LaborHere is another picture with a little closer look at the inside of one of the dried apricots. They have such a beautiful color on the inside. I have been enjoying some of them tonight.

Apricot Jam, Apricot Preserves, Jelly, Jam, Fruit PreservesI was also sent home with a jar of apricot preserves. I have not yet opened the jar, but I look forward to trying this out on toast or in a peanut butter sandwich.

Apricot Jam, Apricot Preserves, Jelly, Jam, Fruit PreservesI did not mention in the previous post that we saved the smaller and firmer apricots for use in making preserves.

I really like the way that the preserves look in the jar. Especially the side of the jar with the Ball logo. Someday I plan on writing a post about canning jars, but need to do a bit more research and find more examples to take pictures of.

I will think back to the day we harvested and processed apricots while I enjoy the fruits of my labor.

Do you find that sometimes food tastes better when you help prepare it?

Steven